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Secrets of Shipwrecks

Category: General Article

Shipwreck explorers are called underwater archaeologists, and for good reason. Part astronaut, part archaeologist, and part marine biologist, their submerged research sites are void of breathable air, often under intense water pressure and utterly inhospitable to humans. These investigators must rely on cutting edge science and technology to excavate the forgotten ruins of shipwrecks to uncover clues to an earlier way of life.

On May 23, 2015, the Oregon Coast Aquarium opens its Secrets of Shipwrecks exhibit. The items presented here will help you expand your discovery of some of the most amazing underwater archaeological sites along the Oregon Coast and around the world.

Oregon’s Own: The Shipwrecks That Define Our Coast

These features are specific to shipwrecks which occurred along the Oregon Coast.

J. Marhoffer and Boiler Bay State Scenic Viewpoint | Emily G Reed: Shipwreck in My Backyard | Landmark Places: The Sujameco’s Iron Skeleton | Life in Ruins: The Wreck of the Mary D. Hume | Peter Iredale: Our Most Famous Shipwreck | The Glenesslin Wreck: Folly or Fraud? | The Mimi: Saved, Then Lost | The Mystery of the Beeswax Wreck | New Carissa: Disaster for the Oregon Coast

World Wrecks: Archaeological Discoveries From Around the Globe

These features highlight some of the more fascinating ship and plane wrecks from around the Pacific Ocean and in other parts of the world.

Fun Fact: Nikumaroro’s Secret Shipwreck | Hunting Pirates: Using Science and Technology to Find Infamous Shipwrecks | Shipwrecked by Design: The Environmental Disaster Behind Mauritania’s Ship Graveyard | Still Searching: The Mysterious Disappearance of Amelia Earhart

Related Features: Archaeology in Lakes | Buried Treasure on Neahkahnie Mountain | Oregon’s Pirate King | Youth Activities: SCUBA Diving | Youth Activities: Virtual Explorations

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Emily G. Reed: Shipwreck In My Backyard

Rockaway Beach historian and photographer Don Best discusses what it was like growing up with a major shipwreck in his back yard.